The noble family Pejačević has Bulgarian origin, but at the beginning of the 18th century the members of the family dwelled in various parts of the Habsburg Empire. These parts today belong to the states Croatia, Serbia and Hungary. In the new homeland, the Pejačević family confirmed its baronial title in 1712 and in 1772, for services to the Habsburg dynasty, they received hereditary title of count.
During a period of approximately 250 years the family Pejačević had a range of facilities across the former Habsburg Empire – castles, villas, city palaces, manors and granges. Most of this residences have been preserved in Croatia, while buildings in Serbia were destroyed during the Second World War.
The only residential building that remains in Serbia is the modest manor house in Moja Volja. Today Moja Volja is village in municipality of Inđija. The name of a place is very interesting and on English it means My Will. There is a legend about the origin of the name. Count’s daughter was delighted with the beautiful nature of this place and with the view that stretches from the hill, so she said to her father “My will is to build a palace here”. The name Moja Volja was changed in 1983 in name Jarkovci.
This building dates from the second half of the 19th century. On the old postcards and photos from the end of 19th century and beginnings of 20th century, we can see that here was a several smaller buildings, but they were demolished over time.

The foto from Homeland Museum of Ruma

The foto from Homeland Museum of Ruma

The foto from Homeland Museum of Ruma

The foto from Homeland Museum of Ruma

The foto from Homeland Museum of Ruma

The photo from Homeland Museum of Ruma

Postcard, end of the 19th century, from the collection of the city

Postcard, end of the 19th century, from the collection of the city library in Inđija

On the old ground plan of Moja Volja area, we can see that here was existed a huge pheasant garden. Also old photos shows that on the roofs of the buildings were deer antlers as a decoration. So it is possible that this building was served as a hunting house. Hunting was widespread among the nobility, and like other noble families, the Pejačević family have had a vast tracts of land under the forest and they often had organized hunting events.

Ground plan of Moja Volja area, from Homeland Museum of Ruma

Ground plan of Moja Volja area, from Homeland Museum of Ruma

The foto from Homeland Museum of Ruma

The photo from Homeland Museum of Ruma

On the decoration of facade we can see some elements that indicates on the influence of the neo-byzantine style, such as the imitation of brick decoration, triple-arched windows. The house also has a lot of decorations made of wood and wrought iron. In 20th century, at the front of main facade, a balcony was added in an eclectic style.

Details of decorations on the facade (http://www.panoramio.com/photo/79198469)

Details of decorations on the facade (http://www.panoramio.com/photo/79198469)

This place is also known as the birthplace of the Austrian painter Oskar Sommerfeld (1885-1973). His father was working here as a civil servant of counts Pejačević.

Painter Oskar Sommerfeld

Painter Oskar Sommerfeld

Postcard

Postcard

Between the two World Wars, the Home for blind girls was situated within the house. This institution was under the protection Maria Karađorđević Queen of Yugolslavia. Today, an elementary school is situated within the object.
Even though that the decoration on the facade is damaged and the later modifications are slightly changed the previous appearance, the original charm of the house is still recognizable.

House today

House today

http://gounesco.com.s3-ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/31180120/House-today.jpghttp://gounesco.com.s3-ap-southeast-1.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/31180120/House-today-150x150.jpgDuca GojićBuilt HeritageStudent Programduca goji,travel,world heritage travel
The noble family Pejačević has Bulgarian origin, but at the beginning of the 18th century the members of the family dwelled in various parts of the Habsburg Empire. These parts today belong to the states Croatia, Serbia and Hungary. In the new homeland, the Pejačević family confirmed its baronial...